Fig Jam

ae-fig-drawing-2Fig Jam – by Ann M. Evans – A Fall Recipe
Figs are ripe in California’s Sacramento of California in early August, with a second blush in September. This jam is made in the French style – the fruit is simmered in its own juice until it reaches the consistency of jam. It goes well with a cheese course. This recipe calls for 3 pounds but you double the recipe. Makes about 5-6 half-pints.

3 – 4 pounds ripe figs, stems removed,
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup lemon juice, fresh

Place the fruit into a non-reactive saucepan. Add the sugar. Let it sit for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, and after the 15 minutes, mash the fruit and sugar mixture to create some liquid. Add the lemon and stir. Taste the product to make sure that the sugar/lemon ratio and make any corrections needed. Over medium heat, bring the mixture to a boil. Stir until the sugar is dissolved. Reduce the heat to low and simmer until the jam has a fairly heavy texture, about 30 minutes. Watch it carefully toward the end and stir frequently to prevent scorching of the product on the bottom of the pan.

Using a canner, bring water to a boil. Have several clean ½ pint jars available, with new lids and rings. In a separate small saucepan, bring water to a boil and place lids in to soften their rubber seal. Turn heat off once the water with the lids has boiled.

Ladle hot product into the jars, leaving about 1/2 inch headspace at top. Wipe the rim clean using a paper or flour sackcloth towel. Place a warmed lid on top, then screw a ring on medium tight. Continue filling jars until product is gone. Place jars in the canner ensuring that the jars are covered by 1 inch of boiling water. Place lid on canner and can the product for 15 minutes. Remove jars and place them on a counter on top of a cloth to cool. You should hear a pop when lid seals. There should be no give to the top when you test the jar to see if it is sealed. Any jars not sealed should be placed in refrigerator. See any canning website for additional details.

Label product, including date. Store product in cool, dry place for up to one year.